Q & A

- ABOUT THE ORDINANCE

Q.  What is a Medical Cannabis Dispensing Collective (MCDC)?
Q.  Does the city really need the Safe Access Ordinance of Imperial Beach?
Q.  Does the city really need MCDC’s?
Q.  Do MCDC’s increase crime in neighborhoods where they are located?
Q.  How much will this ordinance cost the city?
Q.  Is Imperial Beach “too small” to allow patients to collectively cultivate cannabis?
Q.  Is it legal to distribute marijuana through a storefront collective?
Q.  Does the ordinance reinstate patients right to grow at home collectively?
Q.  Is medical marijuana really medicine?

- ABOUT THE CAMPAIGN

Q.  Are volunteers needed?
Q.  Can I contribute financially to the campaign?
Q.  How many signatures are needed?
Q.  Who can sign the petition?

 


Q.  What is a Medical Cannabis Dispensing Collective (MCDC)?
A.  In the ordinance, ‘MCDC’ merely means “two or more qualified patients or persons with identification cards who associate … within the City of Imperial Beach, in order to collectively or cooperatively provide medical marijuana from a licensed or permitted location … for use exclusively by their registered members,” in accordance with all state and local laws.


Q.  Does the city really need the Safe Access Ordinance of Imperial Beach?
A.
 Yes.  In 1996 over 56% of Imperial Beach voters approved Proposition 215 to ensure that Californians would have the right to obtain and use cannabis for medical purposes.  In 2003 the California State Legislature adopted Senate Bill 420 to help clarify and further implement Prop. 215 in part by authorizing patients and primary caregivers to associate to collectively or cooperatively cultivate cannabis for medical purposes.

In 2011, voting 4-to-1,  the City Council of Imperial Beach circumvented voters and disregarded the Civil Grand Jury recommendations when they illegally banned the rights given to all local residents under Prop.215 and SB42o who seek doctor recommended medical cannabis.

This ordinance is absolutely required in order to stop city officials from frustrating the purpose and intent of Proposition 215 and Senate Bill 420.  (top)


Q.  Does the city really need MCDC’s?
A.
  Yes.  Patients in the city with no space to cultivate cannabis, those without the requisite gardening skills to grow their own, and, most critically, those who face the sudden onset of a serious illness or who have suffered a catastrophic injury — all rely on collectives as a community-based, compassionate  solutions that is an alternative to potentially dangerous illicit market transactions.

MCDC’s are exactly what the legislature intended for the local implementation of the ‘collectively or cooperatively’ cultivating portion of Senate Bill 420, the Medical Marijuana Program Act. (top)


Q.  Do MCDC’s increase crime in neighborhoods where they are located?
A.
  No.  Actually, crime statistics and the accounts of local officials surveyed by Americans for Safe Access,  the RAND  Corporation, and the even the local Imperial Beach Patch indicate that crime is actually reduced by the presence of a dispensing collectives.

Additionally, complaints from citizens and surrounding businesses are either negligible or are significantly reduced with the implementation of sensible regulations. (top)


Q.  How much will this ordinance cost the city?
A.  If we gather enough signatures, City officials will have the opportunity to place the ordinance into law without spending anymore tax payer dollars on banning safe access to some of the city’s most vulnerable residents.

On the other hand… if city officials continue the status quo “free-for-all, limitless spending of local tax dollars to ban patients from cultivating collectively, the cost will be between $10,000 and $12,000 to place the initiative on the next ballot, or as much as $75,000 if a special election is required.  (top)


Q.  Is Imperial Beach “too small” to allow patients to collectively cultivate cannabis?
A.  
No!  Of course not, that’s just plain ridiculous.  It would be like saying, “Imperial Beach is too small to have residents who face the sudden onset of a serious illness or who have suffered a catastrophic injury.”  (top) 


Q.  Is it legal to distribute marijuana through a storefront collective?
A.
 Yes.  The California Attorney General published “Guidelines For The Security And Non-diversion Of Marijuana Grown For Medical Use,” in August 2008, which states that “a properly organized and operated collective or cooperative that dispenses medical marijuana through a storefront may be lawful under California law,” provided the facility substantially complies with the guidelines.

The AG’s Guideline has withstood all legal challenges presented by San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis, who has been an unsuccessful fierce fighter against medical marijuana laws.  (top)


Q.  Does the ordinance reinstate patients right to grow at home collectively?
A.  Yes, patients would no longer be subjected to the city’s civil fines and penalties for carrying out their legal right to collectively cultivate in the privacy of their own home. (top) 


Q.  Is medical marijuana really medicine?
A.  Yes, please take the time to learn the facts about cannabis as a medicine here.  (top)


Q.  Are volunteers needed?
A.  Yes, yes.. YES!  We need as many advocates as possible to make the ordinance a reality.  (top)


Q.  Can I contribute financially to the campaign?
A.  Yes!  This is a 100% grassroots community based effort, with the City currently using your tax money to fight against patients and the will of the voters in Imperial Beach.   We can not do it without donations from patient advocates and supporters like you!  (top)


Q.  How many signatures are required?
A.  Just over 1,000 are required to qualify the initiative for the November 2012 ballot.  (top)


Q.  Who can sign the petition?
A.  Only registered voters who live in the city of Imperial Beach.  (top)


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